Thursday, February 29, 2024
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Daywatch: Former aide to Michael Madigan back in court

Hello, Chicago.

An FBI wiretap released during Tim Mapes’ perjury trial last year captured longtime aide to House Speaker Michael Madigan asking a colleague if he was going to put on his “big boy pants » before carrying out a politically thorny order from Madigan.

Today it will be Mapes’ turn to put on the big boy’s pants.

Mapes, who served for years as Madigan’s abrasive and cantankerous chief of staff, executive director of the Madigan-led Illinois Democratic Party and clerk of the House, is expected to be sentenced for lying to a federal grand jury investigating his former leader.

Read the full story from the Tribune’s Jason Meisner.

Here are the top stories you need to know to start your day.

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Marilieser Gil-Blanco, center, waits with her cousin Jefferson Cañizalez for a medical appointment at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago on February 6, 2024. (Armando L. Sanchez/Chicago Tribune)

A migrant family in danger: he is paralyzed. She has just had a cesarean section and is caring for her husband and children. And their immigration papers were thrown away.

Genesis Chacon was pregnant when she essentially flew her husband and child across countries to get to Chicago.

Her husband, healthy and able-bodied, became paralyzed from the chest down due to a rare illness he developed during their trip to the United States last summer. Today, the 22-year-old Venezuelan mother meets her every need, even though she is recovering from a cesarean section she had four weeks ago to give birth to her daughter.

Johnson 6 months

Ald.  Carlos Ramirez Rosa, 35th, celebrates with Mayor Brandon Johnson and members of the Bring Chicago Home coalition at a news conference after a Chicago City Council committee advanced an ordinance that would ask voters to increase property transfer taxes to combat homelessness, October 31.  , 2023.

Eileen T. Meslar/Chicago Tribune

Ald. Carlos Ramirez Rosa, 35th, celebrates with Mayor Brandon Johnson and members of the Bring Chicago Home coalition at a news conference after a Chicago City Council committee advanced an ordinance that would ask voters to increase property transfer taxes to combat homelessness, October 31. , 2023.

Mayor Johnson did not act on Lightfoot’s order targeting the power of neighborhood aldermen

On her final weekday in office, former Mayor Lori Lightfoot fired one final shot at the Chicago City Council: a series of 11 executive orders, one of which took aim at the City Council’s longstanding tradition of aldermen had almost complete control over the development of their districts, which she saw as a root of corruption.

However, nine months into his term, Mayor Brandon Johnson and his aldermanic allies have failed to implement the changes ordered by Lightfoot.

A building located at 306 10th Street is shown on February 8, 2024 in Waukegan.  The building was recently purchased by the Elite Striders drilling crew and will be renovated with funds secured from capital projects by State Rep. Rita Mayfield.  (John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)
A building located at 306 10th Street is shown on February 8, 2024 in Waukegan. The building was recently purchased by the Elite Striders drilling crew and will be renovated with funds secured from capital projects by State Rep. Rita Mayfield. (John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)

Democrats flexed their muscles by handing out pork in Springfield

Gov. JB Pritzker and his fellow Illinois Democrats approved more than $150 million in the current state budget for local projects hand-picked by their party, a power play on Republicans whose The scale and secrecy are unusual, even in Springfield’s history of chronic partisan games. .

In a state known for negotiating local pork project funds in at least somewhat bipartisan fashion, the maneuver illustrated how Democrats enjoying extraordinary majorities in the House and Senate have flexed their dominance and let the party’s Republican lawmakers minority in need.

Susan Jicha takes a rescued pigeon named Greta out of her cage at her home in Chicago's Uptown neighborhood on February 7, 2024. Jicha is one of the founding members of Great Lakes Pigeon Rescue and currently has seven pigeons in her care at home.  (John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)
Susan Jicha takes a rescued pigeon named Greta out of her cage at her home in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood on February 7, 2024. Jicha is one of the founding members of Great Lakes Pigeon Rescue and currently has seven pigeons in her care at home. (John J. Kim/Chicago Tribune)

The ‘underbird’ is no more: Chicago pigeon owners and enthusiasts say it’s time to consider city dwellers a ‘symbol of beauty’

When Susan Jicha welcomes guests to her downtown home, her pets like to make the introductions. Her dog, Rosie, wags her tail at the door, and her bird, Kahlo, wobbles under the TV stand to perch on her hand.

Kahlo is happy and independent, the 68-year-old retired teacher said. His claim that he is the most photographed bird on the North Side rings true since he stretches his neck as if he is posing. Clearly, he’s “living the good life.”

Private Fritz Pollard Jr., of Chicago, served in the Army just like his father.  Pollard Jr. served as a range instructor for other black soldiers at the Engineer Replacement Training Center at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri, circa 1942. (Chicago Tribune archives)
Private Fritz Pollard Jr., of Chicago, served in the Army just like his father. Pollard Jr. served as a range instructor for other black soldiers at the Engineer Replacement Training Center at Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri, circa 1942. (Chicago Tribune archives)

The remarkable Pollards, first black family to settle in Rogers Park

According to his son, the challenges Fritz Pollard and his siblings faced as the first black family in West Rogers Park were a major reason for their success in life.

“Growing up in an all-white neighborhood made you an overachiever,” Fritz Pollard Jr., who lived in his family’s home at 1928 W. Lunt Ave. on Chicago’s Far North Side, said in the book ” Fritz Pollard: Pioneer of Racial Advancement” by John M. Carroll.

The family’s remarkable history led the current owners of the Lunt Avenue home to attempt to have an adjoining park renamed in the Pollards’ honor.

Chicago Marathon

Kelvin Kiptum celebrates his world record victory in the Chicago Marathon, in 2:00:35, at Grant Park in Chicago, October 8, 2023.

Eileen T. Meslar/Chicago Tribune

Kelvin Kiptum celebrates his world record victory in the Chicago Marathon, in 2:00:35, at Grant Park in Chicago, October 8, 2023.

Chicago Marathon winner and world record holder Kelvin Kiptum, 24, dies in car crash in Kenya

Kelvin Kiptum, the marathon world record holder who was expected to become a long-distance running superstar, was killed along with his coach in a car crash in Kenya on Sunday evening.

Iowa Hawkeyes guard Caitlin Clark drives to the basket while defended by Northwest Wildcats guard Melannie Daley in the second half at Welsh-Ryan Arena on January 31, 2024, in Evanston.

Stacey Wescott/Chicago Tribune

Iowa Hawkeyes guard Caitlin Clark drives to the basket while defended by Northwest Wildcats guard Melannie Daley in the second half at Welsh-Ryan Arena on January 31, 2024, in Evanston.

Column: With NIL, Caitlin Clark could usher in a new era of support for WNBA players

One particular part of the speech is the oft-repeated idea that she would take “a pay cut” to play in the WNBA.

This incorrect understanding likely stems from the fact that new name, image and likeness agreements in college athletics are viewed as a salary that somehow disappears when a player leaves school.

To get a better understanding, the Tribune’s Shakeia Taylor spoke with an expert.

Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Mecole Hardman Jr. celebrates his game-winning touchdown with quarterback Patrick Mahomes in overtime during the NFL Super Bowl 58 football game against the San Francisco 49ers on February 11, 2024, in Las Vegas.  The Chiefs won 25-22.  (Abbie Parr/AP)
Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Mecole Hardman Jr. celebrates his game-winning touchdown with quarterback Patrick Mahomes in overtime during the NFL Super Bowl 58 football game against the San Francisco 49ers on February 11, 2024, in Las Vegas. (Abbie Parr/AP)

Kansas City Chiefs defeat San Francisco 49ers in overtime to win Super Bowl LVIII, 25-22

The Chiefs won their third Super Bowl title in five years and firmly established themselves as a dynasty.

Usher performs during halftime of the NFL Super Bowl 58 football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs on February 11, 2024, in Las Vegas.  (Brynn Anderson/AP)
Usher performs during halftime of the NFL Super Bowl 58 football game between the San Francisco 49ers and the Kansas City Chiefs on February 11, 2024, in Las Vegas. (Brynn Anderson/AP)

Usher rocks the 2024 Super Bowl halftime show with help from Alicia Keys, Lil Jon and Ludacris

Usher appeared at Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas for the 2024 Super Bowl halftime show sitting on a throne, joined by a marching band and a group of Vegas performers – but remained front and center.

It was an immediate confirmation of his position as the ideal halftime performer: an artist with timeless, well-known hits, masterful choreography and a devoted audience. He started with “Caught Up,” then “U Don’t Have to Call,” Superstar and “Love in the Club.”

Beyoncé, left, accepts the award for best dance/electronic album for "Renaissance" during the 65th annual Grammy Awards on February 5, 2023, in Los Angeles.
Beyoncé, left, accepts the award for best dance/electronic music album for “Renaissance” at the 65th annual Grammy Awards on February 5, 2023, in Los Angeles.

Beyoncé announces “Renaissance Part II” in Super Bowl commercial

In the elaborate, self-referencing ad, we see Beyoncé scrolling through songs on an iPhone, then in front of a lemonade stand (referencing her classic 2016 album of the same name), followed by a series of plays on his name: “Barbey”. referring to Barbie, “BOTUS”, saying she will be the first female president, then the first woman to launch the first rocket for the first woman in space.

Finally, she said, “OK, they’re ready – forget the new music.” I told you, the “Renaissance” is not over,” she concludes.

Note: The content and images used in this article is rewritten and sourced from www.chicagotribune.com

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